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The real deal
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Gone with the wind

The itching sensation in his fingertips didn’t go away. He held his breath and got so close – the slightly too long nail on his middle finger was almost touching the surface. A drop of sweat broke on his forehead and slowly rolled down between his eyebrows balancing on the tip of his nose. What happens if you do the exact opposite of everything you’ve been told? “I’m too old for this – I should probably go,” he thought. And there he gave up. Shift, touch, shiver, gone. Better.

Project description

In a project exploring food systems and production, I created a series of tableware. A glitch in the system is basically the only time a public understanding of the reality of production and consumption is emerging. The moment “Horse-meat”  in its beefy disguise gets dragged into the flashlight of public attention, delivery routes, origin manufacturing, and price dumping find their way on the table too. The false sense of security reveals its fragile nature and leaves an uncanny feeling desperate for the next cover-up.

“Gone with the wind” is a series of table wear object as advocates and conversation piece for the fragile complex ecosystem we take for granted. Metal dust bound by an electromagnetic resin materializes everyday objects that will reveal their delicate nature under the human touch. The moment a human body (and its electrostatic field) touches the surface, the object will immediately disintegrate to dust.

Project info
Details

Title : Future Fortunes
Year : 2013, Stockholm
Role : Experience Designer

Perspectives

Is : Untouchable
Should be : Handled with extreme care
Will : only be felt once